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We Have a Snake in the Yard!

Every once in a while, when we’re out in our summery yard enjoying birds and flowers, we encounter a snake. We’ve been around snakes for decades and know there are no venomous species in our area but we’re still startled when one slithers away.

Managing a yard to attract a diversity of wildlife sometimes encourages snakes to move in along with birds and butterflies.  Usually the snakes that visit yards are non-venomous species merely looking for a place to live and something for dinner.  Most common are garter snakes that mostly eat insects. We’ve written about garter snakes on Winding Pathways before.  Sometimes we spot tiny brown snakes no bigger than a nightcrawler. They also eat worms and bugs. Once in a while we see a beautifully colored and patterned fox snake. They probably seek tasty white footed mice or maybe a chipmunk. And lots of folks combat the undermining work of chipmunks.

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4 Responses to We Have a Snake in the Yard!

  1. Jacqueline N. Hull June 22, 2017 at 9:25 am #

    We have had a five foot black snake frequent our flower and vegetable garden the past several years. This year I haven’t seen it. Because a black snake kept getting tangled up in our screening we put over the strawberry patch, I came up with an idea of making an actual screen to fit on top of the raised bed. It worked and no emergencies. (: Just so you know, we never killed the black snake. I, yes, me, very carefully disentangled the black snake with a pair of scissors. Peter wore his heavy leather gloves because he was concerned about being bitten. However, the snake was so dramatized that he never was aggressive to either of us. I’m hoping after being carried across the lane to the trees and shrubs that he survived.

  2. Melissa Reid June 22, 2017 at 9:48 am #

    I enjoy many of your articles and find them scientifically accurate. I was disappointed to see you all reference “nonpoisonous” several times when discussing snakes. Please use the correct term, venomous. I know the public uses both, but there are no poisonous snakes that scientists know of.

    Thanks!

    • Rich Patterson July 3, 2017 at 4:11 pm #

      Thank you. M~

    • Rich Patterson July 23, 2017 at 9:16 am #

      Melissa: I did make the change and appreciate your comment. Be well. M~

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